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Effects of automated immunization registry reporting via an electronic health record deployed in community practice settings

Journal: Applied Clinical Informatics
ISSN: 1869-0327
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4338/ACI-2013-02-CR-0009
Issue: Vol. 4: Issue 2 2013
Pages: 267-275

Effects of automated immunization registry reporting via an electronic health record deployed in community practice settings

Case Report

J. Merrill (1), A. Phillips (2), J. Keeling (3), R. Kaushal (4), Y. Senathirajah (5)

(1) Columbia University, Biomedical Informatics, New York, New York, United States; (2) MGH Institute of Health Professions, School of Nursing, Boston, Massachusetts, United States; (3) Columbia University, Department of Biomedical Informatics, New York, New York, United States; (4) Weill Cornell Medical College, Pediatrics, United States; (5) Department of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

Keywords

Public Health, Immunization, Electronic health records, health information exchange

Summary

Background: Among the expected benefits of electronic health records (EHRs) is increased reporting of public health information, such as immunization status. State and local immunization registries aid control of vaccine-preventable diseases and help offset fragmentation in healthcare, but reporting is often slow and incomplete. The Primary Care Information Project (PCIP), an initiative of the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, has implemented EHRs with immunization reporting capability in community settings.

Objective and Methods: To evaluate the effect of automated reporting via an EHR on use and efficiency of reporting to the NY Citywide Immunization Registry, we conducted a secondary analysis of 1.7 million de-identified records submitted between January 2007 and June 2011 by 217 primary care practices enrolled in PCIP, pre and post launch of automated reporting via an EHR. We examined differences in records submitted per day, lag time, and documentation of eligibility for subsidized vaccines.

Results: Mean submissions per day did not change. Automated submissions of new and historical records increased by 18% and 98% respectively. Submissions within 14 days increased from 84% to 87%, and within 2 days increased from 60% to 77%. Median lag time decreased from 13 to 10 days. Documentation of eligibility decreased. Results are significant at p<0.001.

Conclusions: Significant improvements in registry use and efficiency of reporting were found after launch of automated reporting via an EHR. A decrease in eligibility documentation was attributed to EHR workflow. The limitations to comprehensive evaluation found in these data, which were extracted from a registry initiated prior to widespread EHR implementation suggests that reliable evaluation of immunization reporting via the EHR may require modifications to legacy registry databases.

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